Monthly Archives: July 2015

Angler Education (or lack thereof)

Every US state requires some sort of certification prior to issuing a hunting license. Most do the same for a trapping license as well.  But nothing of the sort exists for obtaining an angling license. As much as I enjoy seeing a kid walking/biking to the local river to fish, it causes me to wonder if they know what they are doing?

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This kid obviously knows what he’s doing. After all, he lives under the same roof with a Fly Fishing Guide/Tree Hugger.

The Oregon Department of Fishing & Wildlife does an outstanding job of promoting the sport of angling. They put on numerous seminars and clinics around the state introducing kids (and adults) to the sport. They have a huge network of volunteers that receive instruction and certification. The ODFW provides basic instruction on the various fishing methods and opportunities in each area. They also have “free fishing days” and family fishing events. It’s a great program in most respects.  But there are a few things missing, at least as far as I’ve seen when attending and/or assisting with various events.

Some of the areas I would like to see expanded on are:

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Perfect Storm is Brewing

If you haven’t seen the movie “Perfect Storm”, I recommend you rent it, stream it, etc.  It’s a good flick about some commercial fisherman on the eastern seaboard that get caught out at sea when two major storm systems collide.  But this isn’t about the movie.  The storm I’m talking about is coming our way in the form of the current drought and the forming of an El Nino in the Pacific.

Sea surface temperature during an El Niño event.

This link to NOAA Fisheries site has some great information about El Nino conditions that I won’t detail here.  Let’s just suffice to say that it’s bad news for Pacific Salmon and Steelhead.  El Ninos occur pretty regularly.  Warmer water than normal moves up the coasts of South, Central and North America and impact all inhabitants of the Pacific Ocean – from the bottom of the food chain to the top.  The El Nino forming now is expected to be very strong – one of the warmest in the past 50 years.  For Salmon and Steelhead, it means less forage fish (food) and a condensed environment.  Generally salmon and steelhead experience reduced growth and increase mortality during an El Nino.

This is the rotten cherry on top of a crappy ice cream sundae.

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Hatchery Kill – Who pays?

Earlier this week a clogged inlet stopped flowing water from entering the raceways containing 400,000 juvenile salmon at the Rock Creek Hatchery along the North Umpqua River.  All of the young fish were killed.  My 1st thought was “there’s goes a half million dollars!”.

635711922321673467-Rock-Creek-HatcheryThose juvenile fish were set to be released into the North Umpqua next spring, to begin their 3-5 year life cycle, with the final stage being a return to where they were released to start the process all over again.  400,000 fish sounds like a lot, and it is, but generally, hatchery returns are around 0.7%- 1.2%.  So in the end, we lost 3,000 – 4,500 returning adults 3 to 5 years from now.

What happens to the other 395,000 fish that are released each and every year?  I’m guessing that a whole lot of them don’t survive the first week after being released. Let’s jump back a little and look at the process.

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